The importance of prior knowledge and childs life experiences in the children learning ability

How they process and integrate new information will, in turn, affect how they remember, think, apply, and create new knowledge.

The importance of prior knowledge and childs life experiences in the children learning ability

Census Bureau, March Enhancing students' academic background knowledge, then, is a worthy goal of public education from a number of perspectives. In fact, given the relationship between academic background knowledge and academic achievement, one can make the case that it should be at the top of any list of interventions intended to enhance student achievement.

If not addressed by schools, academic background can create great advantages for some students and great disadvantages for others. The scope of the disparity becomes evident when we consider how background knowledge is acquired.

How We Acquire Background Knowledge We acquire background knowledge through the interaction of two factors: The ability to process and store information is a component of what cognitive psychologists refer to as fluid intelligence. As described by Cattellfluid intelligence is innate.

One of its defining features is the ability to process information and store it in permanent memory. High fluid intelligence is associated with enhanced ability to process and store information. Low fluid intelligence is associated with diminished ability to process and store information.

The importance of prior knowledge and childs life experiences in the children learning ability

Our ability to process and store information dictates whether our experiences parlay into background knowledge. To illustrate, consider two students who visit a museum and see exactly the same exhibits.

One student has an enhanced capacity to process and store information, or high fluid intelligence; the other has a diminished capacity to process and store information, or low fluid intelligence.

The student with high fluid intelligence will retain most of the museum experience as new knowledge in permanent memory. The student with low fluid intelligence will not. In effect, the student with the enhanced information-processing capacity has translated the museum experience into academic background knowledge; the other has not.

As Sternberg explains: The second factor that influences the development of academic background knowledge is our academically oriented experiential base—the number of experiences that will directly add to our knowledge of content we encounter in school.

The more academically oriented experiences we have, the more opportunities we have to store those experiences as academic background knowledge. Again, consider our two students at the museum. Assume that one student has an experience like visiting a museum once a week and the other student has experiences like this once a month.

The second student might have an equal number of other types of experiences, but they are nonacademic and provide little opportunity to enhance academic background knowledge. It is the interaction of students' information-processing abilities and their access to academically oriented experiences, then, that produces their academic background knowledge.

Differences in these factors create differences in their academic background knowledge and, consequently, differences in their academic achievement. An examination of the interaction of these factors paints a sobering picture of the academic advantages possessed by some students and not others.

The darker the box, the more academic background knowledge a student has. Allen has the most background knowledge. He has a great deal of access to experiences that build academic background knowledge and exceptional ability to process and store those experiences. We might say that Allen is doubly blessed because of his ability to process information and his access to many experiences that will be translated into academic background knowledge.

Barbara and Calvin are next in order of the amount of academic background knowledge but for slightly different reasons.

Barbara has midlevel access to experiences but a highly developed ability to process and store information.Importance of Prior Knowledge to Learning Jim Gee January 20, People develop attitudes and beliefs as they progress through life. For the instructor, it is important to assess such prior knowledge or attitudes and beliefs very early in the semester since the knowledge students possess may either promote or hinder their learning.

A child's genetic background will influence his ability to learn, but good educational experiences can enhance these abilities. Some kids might struggle with learning disabilities influenced by genetics, but quality educational interventions can help kids learn and do well in school.

How to Assess Students’ Prior Knowledge In order to gauge how much students have learned, it is not enough to assess their knowledge and skills at the end of the course or program.

We also need to find out what they know coming in so that we can identify more specifically the knowledge and skills they have gained during the course or program. The Importance of Prior Knowledge and Child's Life Experiences in the Children Learning Ability PAGES 1.

WORDS View Full Essay. More essays like this: children learning ability, life expectancies, prior knowledge.

Objectives of this workshop You will be able to: • Identify four problematic prior knowledge (PK) situations. • Generate examples of each in your own discipline. Launching the learning in your classroom from the prior knowledge of your students is a tenet of good teaching. In an earlier post about scaffolding techniques, I also wrote that asking students to share their own experiences, hunches, and ideas about the content or concept of study and relating it to their own lives should be done at the. Since new knowledge and skill is dependent on pre-existing knowledge and skill, knowing what students know and can do when they come into the classroom or before they begin a new topic of study, can help us craft instructional activities that build off of student strengths and .

children learning ability, life expectancies, prior knowledge. The importance of children’s cultural knowledge has become a major theme in the study of children’s learning.

Because culture supports children’s thinking, the activities, toys, materials and social events. Activating prior knowledge, or schema, is the first of seven strategies that Keene and Zimmerman identify as key for reading comprehension success. "Teaching children which thinking strategies are used by proficient readers and helping them use those strategies independently creates the core of teaching reading.".

The importance of prior knowledge and childs life experiences in the children learning ability
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