Evolution essays on aspects of evolutionary biology

Historians have shown that this traditional account is biased and distorted, a construction many years after the fact by the Darwinians and their allies, yet it continues to live on, even in literary studies.

Evolution essays on aspects of evolutionary biology

Support Aeon Donate now When researchers at Emory University in Atlanta trained mice to fear the smell of almonds by pairing it with electric shocksthey foundto their consternation, that both the children and grandchildren of these mice were spontaneously afraid of the same smell.

That is not supposed to happen. Generations of schoolchildren have been taught that the inheritance of acquired characteristics is impossible.

Evolution essays on aspects of evolutionary biology

A mouse should not be born with something its parents have learned during their lifetimes, any more than a mouse that loses its tail in an accident should give birth to tailless mice.

Yet as novel ideas flood in from genomics, epigenetics and developmental biology, most evolutionists agree that their field is in flux. Much of the data implies that evolution is more complex than we once assumed.

Some evolutionary biologists, myself included, are calling for a broader characterisation of evolutionary theory, known as the extended evolutionary synthesis EES.

A central issue is whether what happens to organisms during their lifetime — their development — can play important and previously unanticipated roles in evolution.

The orthodox view has been that developmental processes are largely irrelevant to evolution, but the EES views them as pivotal. Protagonists with authoritative credentials square up on both sides of this debate, with big-shot professors at Ivy League universities and members of national academies going head-to-head over the mechanisms of evolution.

Some people are even starting to wonder if a revolution is on the cards. In his book On Human Naturethe evolutionary biologist Edward O Wilson claimed that human culture is held on a genetic leash.

The metaphor was contentious for two reasons. Second, while there must be a genetic propensity for cultural learning, few cultural differences can be explained by underlying genetic differences.

Nonetheless, the phrase has explanatory potential. Imagine a dog-walker the genes struggling to retain control of a brawny mastiff human culture. Now imagine the same dog-walker struggling with multiple dogs, on leashes of varied lengths, with each dog tugging in different directions.

All these tugs represent the influence of developmental factors, including epigenetics, antibodies and hormones passed on by parents, as well as the ecological legacies and culture they bequeath.

Image courtesy the author. The struggling dog-walker is a good metaphor for how EES views the adaptive process. Does this require a revolution in evolution? Before we can answer this question, we need to examine how science works.

The best authorities here are not biologists but philosophers and historians of science. He maintained that scientists should strive to carry out critical experiments that could potentially falsify their theories.

Contemporary thinking in these fields is better captured by the Hungarian philosopher Imre Lakatos in The Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes The history of science refutes both Popper and Kuhn: Scientific observations are susceptible to errors of measurement; scientists are human beings and get attached to their theories; and scientific ideas can be fiendishly complex — all of which makes evaluating scientific hypotheses a messy business.

This sort of behaviour is clearly manifest in scientific debates over evolution. Take the idea that new features acquired by an organism during its life can be passed on to the next generation.

This hypothesis was brought to prominence in the early s by the French biologist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, who used it to explain how species evolved. Everything from diet to air pollution to parental behaviour can influence the addition or removal of these chemical marks, which switches genes on or off.

Sample Essay - Evolution: Modern Evolutionary Biology | Seminars on Science

There are now hundreds of such studiesmany published in the most prominent and prestigious journals. Biologists dispute whether epigenetic inheritance is truly Lamarckian or only superficially resembles it, but there is no getting away from the fact that the inheritance of acquired characteristics really does happen.

Yet, by and large, evolutionary biologists have not rushed to change their theories. Rather, as Lakatos anticipated, we have come up with auxiliary hypotheses that allow us to retain our long-held beliefs ie, that inheritance is pretty much explained by the transmission of genes across generations.

These include the ideas that epigenetic inheritance is rare, that it does not affect functionally important traits, that it is under genetic control, and that it is too unstable to underpin the spread of traits through selection.

Unfortunately for the traditionalists, none of these attempts to bracket epigenetic inheritance look credible. It is now known to be widespread in naturewith more and more examples appearing every day.

In some systems where rates of epigenetic change have been measured carefully, such as the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the pace has been found to be low enough to be selected and lead to cumulative evolution. Mathematical models have shown that systems with epigenetic inheritance evolve differently from those solely reliant on genetic inheritance — for instance, selection on epigenetic marks can cause changes in gene frequencies.Charles Darwin was born in , seven years after his grandfather Erasmus had died.

Charles grew up during a conservative period in British and American society, shortly after the Napoleonic Wars. Introduction Taking isolated similarities by themselves, the theory of evolution appears to be quite reasonable to a point.

However, it seems that too much weight has been placed on similarities without questioning the differences. acquired trait: A phenotypic characteristic, acquired during growth and development, that is not genetically based and therefore cannot be passed on to the next generation (for example, the large.

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Understanding Evolution: History, Theory, Evidence, and Implictions

A more comprehensive version of evolutionary theory that focuses as much on the origin of biological form as on its diversification. The field of evolutionary biology arose from the desire to understand the origin and diversity of biological forms.

Though the process of evolution is not the only theory, schools have been teaching it as if it is the complete truth, ignoring other aspects and only focusing and targeting on Darwin's theory of Evolution.

Biology Blog: Evolution Essay